Thoughts on CS6460: Education Technology

I recently completed the OMSCS course on Education Technology and found it to be one of the most innovative courses I’ve taken. There is no pre-defined curriculum and syllabus, though there are many videos and materials available. Learners have the autonomy and freedom to view the course videos and materials in any order and at their own pace. The course is focused around a big project, and learners pick up the necessary knowledge and skills as they progress on the project.

Here’s my thoughts on the course for those who are looking to enrol as well.

Why take the course?

One question I’ve asked myself (and close friends): “What do you think humanity needs most?” For Bill Gates, it was personal computing. For Elon Musk, it’s becoming a multi-planet species and clean vehicles and energy. Personally, my goals are not as lofty—I believe that humanity needs healthcare and education most. This belief, and the availability of these electives, was one of the key reasons I enrolled in OMSCS. Thus, I was elated to get a spot at the immensely popular EdTech course.

There are many rave reviews on how David Joyner is an excellent professor. His courses (i.e., human computer interaction, knowledge-based AI, and education technology) have great reviews and are notable for their rigour and educational value. He is also a strong proponent of scaling education (which I believe is one of the key approaches to improving education). Here’s his recent paper on scaling Computer Science education.

Being keenly interested on how I could use technology (and perhaps data science) to improve education and learning outcomes, I enrolled for the course in Summer 2018.

What’s the course like?

If you’re looking for a traditional post-graduate level course, you’ll not find it here. There is a surprising lack of obvious structure and step-by-step instructions. For some learners, they found this to be disorienting (initially), with some people getting lost along the way. For others, they found the course structure (wait, didn’t you say there’s no structure?) to be refreshing, allowing them to direct their focus and effort more effectively and learn more.

There’s no structure? What do you mean?

For a start, there are no weekly lectures. There is also no weekly reading list. Right from week 1, you’re immersed in the deep end. Your first assignment requires you to pick a few projects of interest, out of hundreds, and discuss them in an essay. There is a rich repository of curated videos, articles, and papers available from the first week, and you can view all of them in week 1, or none by the end of the course. This can feel like too much freedom for some learners, and slightly overwhelming.

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